Sing Log Homes - Easy to Build Home Design
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Step 2: Installing the First Layer of Sing Logs

Once the foundation is prepared...

Select the logs for the first layer and place them parallel to their permanent locations. Remember that with the butt and pass method, butt joints are staggered, and alternate from course to course. When making room for door space, simply cut the log to allow enough space.

Place the first log with its end reaching to the edge of the foundation making sure that it is aligned in the proper position. Outline the upper face of the log where the tie down plate goes to hold the log to the foundation (use the plate as a guide for tracing, making sure that the rod slides through the aperture in the center). Use a router to notch out the space you traced for the tie down. Make sure it is at least 1/2" deep to fit the thickness of the plate. If you find that blocking in between log halves interferes with the threaded rod, simply knock it out or cut around it. If you knock it out, you may have to replace it in another location by toe nailing it. If you are not using Olyscrews in your project, simply repeat this process every 3 layers, applying adhesive every course, until you reach the top plate.
Sing Sing window buck Sing Window Frames
Remove the first log you want to install, and apply two beads of glue to the sill plate where the wood will have contact with it. Return the log, and place the tie down plates where you have notched out for them, with the threaded rod protruding from the aperture. Tighten nuts with wrench, as tight as you can. When butting logs together, it is important that this vertical seam be as tight as possible. Use plenty of adhesive, and you may also "key" this joint in the hollow space with a piece of 3" (or double 2x4) wood blocking where the seam is, or use rigid foam insulation. You may also decide to chamfer the butt ends to provide an alternate appearance using a router or planer.


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